A CBS variety show that ran monthly from 1954-1958, broadcast in color. Stars appearing included Betty Grable, Mario Lanza, Jack Benny, Basil Rathbone, Fredric March, Shirley MacLaine and ... See full summary »
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Episodes

Seasons


Years



4   3   2   1  
1958   1957   1956   1955   1954  
Won 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Series cast summary:
William Lundigan ...  Himself - Host / ... 20 episodes, 1954-1958
Jack Benny ...  Himself / ... 19 episodes, 1955-1958
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Storyline

A CBS variety show that ran monthly from 1954-1958, broadcast in color. Stars appearing included Betty Grable, Mario Lanza, Jack Benny, Basil Rathbone, Fredric March, Shirley MacLaine and Ed Wynn. Lanza and Grable appeared in an amusing episode with Fred Clark, featuring Grable as the unlikely replacement for Lanza in a show. Written by krbannerman

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

30 September 1954 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Chrysler Shower of Stars See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Black and White (surviving kinescope prints)| Color (original telecasts)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

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User Reviews

What a Waste of Talent!!
10 September 2005 | by juvenalxxSee all my reviews

Frederic March! Basil Rathbone! Maxwell Anderson! Bernard Herrman! Charles Dickens! I certainly hope they got paid well. (With Dickens, I suppose, it didn't matter.)

A denatured adaptation of one of the quirkiest, wittiest, richest stories ever, the majority of the screen time is taken up with over-orchestrated, lyrically clichéd and underwritten pastiche carols and folk songs (although Herrman's music has some lovely melodic and harmonic passages), and with "heartwarming" live commercials for 1956 Chryslers.

March's Scrooge is saddled with an incredibly fake nose, right up there with Alec Guiness's in "Lawrence of Arabia". Worse, March is forced to show redemption and emotion in endless close-ups that show him reacting to the aforementioned songs. Still, fine actor that he is, he does manage to show some moments of humanity.

Rathbone, as Marley, is robbed of 90% of the terrific dialogue originally in Dickens, but he too is able to infuse his character with some pathos and horror.

A fascinating look at what the majority of live TV drama was like in the 50's. Bad as TV can be now, if anyone pines for the good old days, make them watch this.


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