6.8/10
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123 user 38 critic

Around the World in 80 Days (1956)

A Victorian Englishman bets that with the new steamships and railways he can circumnavigate the globe in eighty days.

Directors:

Michael Anderson, John Farrow (uncredited)

Writers:

James Poe (screenplay), John Farrow (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
3,488 ( 625)
Won 5 Oscars. Another 8 wins & 5 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
David Niven ... Phileas Fogg
Cantinflas ... Passepartout
Shirley MacLaine ... Princess Aouda
Robert Newton ... Inspector Fix
Charles Boyer ... Monsieur Gasse - Thomas Cook Paris Clerk
Joe E. Brown ... Fort Kearney Station Master
Martine Carol ... Girl in Paris Railroad Station
John Carradine ... Col. Stamp Proctor - San Francisco Politico
Charles Coburn ... Steamship Company Hong Kong Clerk
Ronald Colman ... Great Indian Peninsular Railway Official
Melville Cooper ... Mr. Talley - Steward R.M.S 'Mongolia'
Noël Coward ... Roland Hesketh-Baggott - London Employment Agency Manager (as Noel Coward)
Finlay Currie ... Andrew Stuart
Reginald Denny ... Bombay Police Inspector
Andy Devine ... First Mate of the 'S. S. Henrietta'
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Storyline

When this movie is made in 1956, one can circumnavigate the globe in a little less than two days. When Jules Verne wrote the story "Around the World in Eighty Days" in 1872, he predicted that one day man could accomplish the task in eighty hours, but which most considered folly to do in eighty days in current times... that is except for people like Englishman Phileas Fogg, a regimented man who believed all it would take is exacting work, the skills he possesses. He just has to make sure a train's schedule meets the required sailing schedule which meets the required coach schedule and so on. As such, he takes up what ends up being the highly publicized £20,000 wager from his fellow members at the London Reform Club to do so, losing the bet which would ruin him financially. Along for the ride is Fogg's new, loyal and devoted valet, the recently arrived Latin immigrant, Passepartout, who possesses unusual skills which could be major assets, but whose all consuming thoughts on the ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

...and the whole world loves it! See more »


Certificate:

6 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Spanish | French

Release Date:

20 December 1957 (Netherlands) See more »

Also Known As:

De reis om de wereld in 80 dagen See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$42,000,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Michael Todd Company See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(35 mm) | (with entr'acte and exit music) | (video) | (TCM print)

Sound Mix:

4-Track Stereo (Mag-optical) (35 mm prints) (1956)| Mono (optical) (35 mm prints) (re-release prints)| 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints) (Westrex Recording System)| 4-Track Stereo (Perspecta Sound encoding) (35 mm magnetic prints) (1956)

Color:

Color (Eastman Color)| Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.20 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Ronald Colman came out of retirement to do his cameo. See more »

Goofs

As the train travels east from San Francisco, the track changes from a dual gauge (a standard and narrow gauge) line to a single gauge track, and back again. See more »

Quotes

Saloon Hostess: [to Phineas Fogg, as he is leaving the saloon] You still in a hurry? I thought the English were calm, dreamy sort of people.
See more »

Crazy Credits

There are no opening credits. The film begins with 'Edward R. Murrow (I)' narrating a prologue showing the history of flight. Then, the actual story begins with no opening credits whatsoever. See more »

Alternate Versions

When Warner Bros. bought the rights to this film from Elizabeth Taylor (to whom United Artists lost control of the film in the 1970s) for its later re-releases, some prints were heavily edited. An uncut print of the 35mm version has been shown on cable TV. See more »

Connections

Version of Novye pokhozhdeniya Kota v Sapogakh (1958) See more »

Soundtracks

Oh! Susanna
(1848) (uncredited)
Music by Stephen Foster
In the score as the train heads east
See more »

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User Reviews

 
This Picture Makes No Sense On A Small Screen
24 December 2004 | by tonstant viewerSee all my reviews

Around the World in 80 Days is part comedy and part demonstration of a new wide-screen process. I saw it in its original run at the old Rivoli Theater in New York, where the screen ran from 48th St. to 49th St. People gasped at the size of the screen when the curtains opened, before the film even got underway.

If you watch the new 16x9 DVD on anything less than a 50-inch television, the visual composition and the pacing are absolutely incomprehensible, and you're on your own to seize on the many little things that are there to entertain you. But as a whole, the film loses its reason for being when viewed on a conventional TV.

David Niven is unbeatable as Phileas Fogg, Shirley Maclaine is implausible but slyly humorous as the Princess, Robert Newton appears sober most of the time and hammy all of it as Inspector Fix.

Cantinflas is inexplicable as Passepartout, except perhaps as Mike Todd's attempt to corral the entire Latin American market. The Mexican comedian's English is very shaky; it slows him down, and his clarity comes and goes and makes me wonder if Paul Frees didn't replace a lot of his lines. At any rate, only in the seemingly improvised encounter with Red Skelton at a buffet does Cantinflas do anything remotely humorous, and there he's the straight man.

The cameos are fun, and if you're too young to know who all these geezers are, it's worth it to find out, and use the IMDb to track down the work that made them famous. I remember the shriek the original audience let out when the piano player was revealed to be Frank Sinatra.

Viewing the film now, I was most moved to see Edmund Lowe and Victor McLaglan reunited in the engine room of the Henrietta, thirty years after they riveted the industry in "What Price Glory?" Buster Keaton concentrates really hard in his appearance as the train conductor, to excellent effect. A. E. Matthews gives a terrific acting lesson in saying "no" a half a dozen times in a London sequence.

Among the original bettors, locate Ronald Squire with the drooping mustache, hollow nasal baritone, and a slouching relaxation while performing that was a marvel - Rex Harrison publicly admired Ronald Squire's ease on stage all his life. In fact, Squire is so relaxed he makes someone like Dean Martin seem uptight.

So, this film is an unusual case - requiring patience for lots of little joys on the small screen, but making sense only on a large one.


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