6.8/10
3,816
46 user 33 critic

The Seven-Per-Cent Solution (1976)

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2:02 | Clip
To treat his friend's cocaine induced delusions, Watson lures Sherlock Holmes to Sigmund Freud.

Director:

Herbert Ross

Writers:

Nicholas Meyer (screenplay), Nicholas Meyer (novel) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Alan Arkin ... Dr. Sigmund Freud
Vanessa Redgrave ... Lola Deveraux
Robert Duvall ... Dr. John H. Watson
Nicol Williamson ... Sherlock Holmes
Laurence Olivier ... Professor James Moriarty (as Sir Laurence Olivier)
Joel Grey ... Lowenstein
Samantha Eggar ... Mary Morstan Watson
Jeremy Kemp ... Baron Karl von Leinsdorf
Charles Gray ... Mycroft Holmes
Régine ... Madame
Georgia Brown ... Frau Freud
Anna Quayle ... Freda
Jill Townsend ... Mrs. Holmes
John Bird John Bird ... Berger
Alison Leggatt Alison Leggatt ... Mrs. Hudson
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Storyline

Concerned about his friend's cocaine use, Dr. Watson tricks Sherlock Holmes into travelling to Vienna, where Holmes enters the care of Sigmund Freud. Freud attempts to solve the mysteries of Holmes' subconscious, while Holmes devotes himself to solving a mystery involving the kidnapping of Lola Deveraux. Written by James Meek <james@oz.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

THE STORY IS TRUE...only the facts have been made up. See more »


Certificate:

12 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English | German | French

Release Date:

2 June 1977 (Netherlands) See more »

Also Known As:

Kein Koks für Sherlock Holmes See more »

Filming Locations:

Austria See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?


Goofs

During the railroad pursuit, the trains are seen on two tracks that are about to merge. Holmes states that there are no points left to switch. However, the coming together of the two track lines necessarily involves a switching point. And, in fact, that set of points is visible soon thereafter. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Dr. John H. Watson: [Watson rings the doorbell of 221-B Baker Street] It was October the 24th, in the year 1891. that I heard for the first time in four months from my friend Sherlock Holmes. On this particular day, a telegram from his landlady, Mrs. Hudson, had been delivered to my surgery, imploring me to return to my former rooms without delay.
Mrs. Hudson: [Mrs. Hudson opens the front door] Oh, Dr. Watson, thank heavens you've come; I'm at my wit's end.
Dr. John H. Watson: Why, what has happened?
Mrs. Hudson: Since you left us these last few ...
[...]
See more »

Crazy Credits

In the opening titles, there are footnotes concerning many of the characters. See more »

Alternate Versions

A sequence was cut in which an elderly Dr Watson apparently reads of Holmes' death in the newspaper. It later turns out to be a report of the death of Sigmund Freud. See more »


Soundtracks

Valse Sentimental
(uncredited)
Music by Franz Schubert
Arranged by John Addison
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User Reviews

 
Holmes like you've never seen him, and should have
11 March 2001 | by CatTalesSee all my reviews

Refreshing, original take on the Holmes Canon. I've heard the main actor was miscast but seeing him running around frenetically in a ratty smoking robe, issuing Sherlock's famous speech about Moriarty (which DOES sound paranoid when you think about it), he gives a true, spontaneous version which is lacking in other Holmes departures. While Holmes meets Jack the ripper in 2 other movies, his character never comes alive as in this movie. Even Peter Cushing as Sherlock in "Hound of the Baskervilles" can't compete. Robert Duvall seems wasted as Watson who has only 6 lines in the movie. Lawrence Olivier is a twin for Moriarty, but strangely doesn't look younger in a 30 year flashback. My only complaint is that upon repeated viewings the climactic train chase seems overlong. I think Conan Doyle would be proud: though he might have been mildly addicted to cocaine and broken his addiction, and thus has Watson proclaiming the same for Holmes, ("he cured himself"), the movie (and novel it's based on) fills a dramatic gap. And Holmes is more a hero for it, battling inner and outer foes (his addiction as well as a mystery).


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